A firm foundation: Christian theology & abortion, Part 2 PDF Print E-mail

23 June 4As the Board of Directors of Presbyterians Pro-Life listens for God's voice and looks for evidence of his leading into the future, we build our ministry on a biblical foundation. In Part 2 of this 1995 document, we review the church's involvement in issues of life and consider our response in light of the role of the Holy Spirit, and the doctrine of the Church.

We Claim the Gift of the Holy Spirit

The church has always proclaimed that we are enabled to live as faithful disciples of Christ by the gift of the Holy Spirit. We are no longer dependent upon our own powers, or captive to our own desires and wills, but rather we are enabled to live by God's will and to walk in his ways by the Spirit of Christ living in us.

It is the Spirit who enables us to pray, "Our Father..." and who himself prays for us (Rom. 8:15, 26-27). It is the Spirit who makes it possible for us to confess Jesus Christ as our Lord (1 Cor. 12:3). And it is the Spirit who gives us the fruit of love and joy, peace and patience, kindness and goodness, faithfulness and gentleness and self-control (Gal. 5:22-23). In the power of the Holy Spirit working in us, we sinful human beings are able to do the good that God wills for us, and not to do evil. Indeed, Paul tells us that our bodies are the temple of the Holy Spirit (1 Cor. 6:19).

The Christian Gospel rejects the notion that we are the victims of complicated and insolvable circumstances and declares us more than conquerors through Him who loves us (Rom. 8:37). By the power of the Spirit we are able to overcome those things that confront us and are able to live victoriously in obedience to God, even in the most difficult of circumstances.

We Claim the Doctrine of the Church

Presbyterians Pro-Life believes that the message and the life of the church are God's answer to problem pregnancies in our time. Our culture's claim is that some children already conceived should not be born into poverty or abuse or rejection or a difficult life. But as members of one another in the family of God, we believe that the problem of the poverty-stricken, of the abused, of the unwanted, or of those needing special care is the anguished call to the church in every community to get to work. The family of God cannot support or aid in the deaths of children in such circumstances as our culture does. Instead, the response of the faithful church must be, in Mother Teresa's words, "If you do not want the child, give him to me; I want him." That surely is the readiness of faith with which the Body of Christ must gird itself in this age of unrestricted abortion.God's Word recognizes our propensity toward sin. Scripture is clear in separating right from wrong, vigilant in warning us away from sexual impurity and doing harm to the innocent, and careful in teaching holiness and obedience to God's commands. The church must be faithful in teaching all of God's Word. That Word also reveals God's provision for rescuing us from our sin. It teaches us the healing and restoration that God promises when we confess and turn from sin and turn to him through faith in Jesus Christ. God knows us through and through and wants to forgive us and restore us to fellowship with

God's Word recognizes our propensity toward sin. Scripture is clear in separating right from wrong, vigilant in warning us away from sexual impurity and doing harm to the innocent, and careful in teaching holiness and obedience to God's commands. The church must be faithful in teaching all of God's Word. That Word also reveals God's provision for rescuing us from our sin. It teaches us the healing and restoration that God promises when we confess and turn from sin and turn to him through faith in Jesus Christ. God knows us through and through and wants to forgive us and restore us to fellowship with himself. And he calls his people to demonstrate their faith through concrete acts of love for one another, to "be doers of the word, and not hearers only" (James 1:22).It follows that God's claim on us as

It follows that God's claim on us as community means we must not say to the pregnant 15-year-old teenager in our midst, "Your pregnancy is your problem," or to the family with a member needing special care, "Caring for that person is your problem." We are responsible for one another, and now problem pregnancies and those needing special care are our shared responsibility before God. The faithful church, we believe, gathers round the pregnant mother in its midst--whoever she may be and however she became pregnant--and gathers around every person and family with special needs. It supports and provides for them in accordance with God's commands, and it cherishes every life that God has entrusted to their care.

It is the Church that knows that message and it is the Church that has been entrusted with the task of faithfully proclaiming the whole of the Gospel to the community of believers; and for extending the loving care of her Lord to all people. The faithful church tries to be the kind of community which will enable all of its members to become faithful disciples of our Lord.


Read PPL's complete publication, A Firm Foundation: Christian Theology & Abortion.

 

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